Dianering

odd and sods and perhaps some musings

Dianering turned 1 today! Actually yesterday, but it’s close enough!

Dianering turned 1 today! Actually yesterday, but it’s close enough!

(Source: secure.assets)

— 17 hours ago
#tumblr birthday  #tumblr milestone 

food52:

You can’t face Game of Thrones on an empty stomach.

Read more: 10 ‘Royal Recipes’ for a Game of Thrones Feast on Food52.

GoT always makes me so hungry, unless they’ve freaked me out so much I can’t eat.

— 2 weeks ago with 259 notes
My kind of picture-in-picture.

My kind of picture-in-picture.

(via date-a-girl-who-reads)

— 2 weeks ago with 4327 notes
mylesmcnutt:

I woke up to a text from my brother: “RIPTWOP.”
The loss of Television Without Pity is a difficult one, although not because it interrupts my daily routine: it’s been years since I’ve visited the site regularly, and probably at least a year since I clicked over to any of its coverage or visited its forums (which I haven’t logged into in probably four years or so).
It’s difficult instead for two different reasons. On the one hand, it’s difficult because of the sheer volume of content that will be lost when the site shuts its doors. It has lived on as an archive of week-by-week engagement with television programming, both in its recaps and—especially—in its forums. From a scholarly perspective, this archive has been both a subject of study in and of itself and a space in which other subjects can be studied (I last used the forums to study audience response to dynamics of race in Showtime’s Weeds during its early seasons, for example). The idea that this archive could be lost (to the public, since NBC Universal has announced they’re archiving it but not for public access) is rightfully a point of concern among the site and its followers, and consider this brief overview my commitment to helping with any archival efforts.
However, the other reason the site’s death is so resonant is because its influence spreads so far beyond its content, both in terms of the careers its creators and writers have gone on to have, and the way it has influenced its readers and commenters—that’s me, in this instance—to engage with television in an in-depth way. For as much as the loss of the site’s content is hard to imagine, it’s even more difficult to imagine a world when that content hadn’t existed. Despite largely being marginalized from contemporary television discourse in the post-Bravo acquisition era, the site’s legacy has lived on in ways that make even the death of the post-Bravo Television Without Pity into a meaningful event for reasons beyond the loss of the content itself.
There is no question that Television Without Pity was a substantial influence in how I engage with television, fostering an engagement with the medium that would bleed into my academic work, frame my early days blogging about television, and eventually exist as a foundation for whatever my academic/critical identities have become. I will always hold at least a bit of a—fake—grudge against the site for popularizing the term “Recap” that has become unnecessarily ubiquitous in thinking about episodic television coverage, but at the end of the day Television Without Pity had an immeasurable impact on a generation of readers that have today taken to social media to reflect on its impact.
The site is shutting down because of how many of those remembrances are in the past tense; the site’s legacy will live on because of how many remembrances there are.

Man, this bums me out! I haven’t been in a couple of weeks, but this site has been a great companion to watch TV with: funny, smart, challenging. I’ll miss being able to get the perspectives of some really great writers!

mylesmcnutt:

I woke up to a text from my brother: “RIPTWOP.”

The loss of Television Without Pity is a difficult one, although not because it interrupts my daily routine: it’s been years since I’ve visited the site regularly, and probably at least a year since I clicked over to any of its coverage or visited its forums (which I haven’t logged into in probably four years or so).

It’s difficult instead for two different reasons. On the one hand, it’s difficult because of the sheer volume of content that will be lost when the site shuts its doors. It has lived on as an archive of week-by-week engagement with television programming, both in its recaps and—especially—in its forums. From a scholarly perspective, this archive has been both a subject of study in and of itself and a space in which other subjects can be studied (I last used the forums to study audience response to dynamics of race in Showtime’s Weeds during its early seasons, for example). The idea that this archive could be lost (to the public, since NBC Universal has announced they’re archiving it but not for public access) is rightfully a point of concern among the site and its followers, and consider this brief overview my commitment to helping with any archival efforts.

However, the other reason the site’s death is so resonant is because its influence spreads so far beyond its content, both in terms of the careers its creators and writers have gone on to have, and the way it has influenced its readers and commenters—that’s me, in this instance—to engage with television in an in-depth way. For as much as the loss of the site’s content is hard to imagine, it’s even more difficult to imagine a world when that content hadn’t existed. Despite largely being marginalized from contemporary television discourse in the post-Bravo acquisition era, the site’s legacy has lived on in ways that make even the death of the post-Bravo Television Without Pity into a meaningful event for reasons beyond the loss of the content itself.

There is no question that Television Without Pity was a substantial influence in how I engage with television, fostering an engagement with the medium that would bleed into my academic work, frame my early days blogging about television, and eventually exist as a foundation for whatever my academic/critical identities have become. I will always hold at least a bit of a—fake—grudge against the site for popularizing the term “Recap” that has become unnecessarily ubiquitous in thinking about episodic television coverage, but at the end of the day Television Without Pity had an immeasurable impact on a generation of readers that have today taken to social media to reflect on its impact.

The site is shutting down because of how many of those remembrances are in the past tense; the site’s legacy will live on because of how many remembrances there are.

Man, this bums me out! I haven’t been in a couple of weeks, but this site has been a great companion to watch TV with: funny, smart, challenging. I’ll miss being able to get the perspectives of some really great writers!

(via popculturebrain)

— 3 weeks ago with 384 notes
10 Great Essays on Social Media →

tetw:

Essential essays about the way we connect

Note to self: Read them all.

— 1 month ago with 86 notes

oupacademic:

Calling all chemistry buffs! Are you attending the American Chemical Society Annual Meeting in Dallas 16-20 March? Well stop by OUP Booth 802 to check out our latest chemistry titles, journals, and online reference. Here’s a brief reading list to get you started. 

  1. A Tale of Seven Elements by Eric Scerri
  2. The Periodic Table: A Very Short Introduction by Eric Scerri
  3. The Scientific Sherlock Holmes: Cracking the Case with Science and Forensics by James O’Brien
  4. ReAction!: Chemistry in the Movies by Mark A. Griep and Marjorie L. Mikasen
  5. Hollywood Chemistry: When Science Met Entertainment, edited by Donna J. Nelson, Kevin R. Grazier, Jaime Paglia, and Sidney Perkowitz
  6. The Science of Cheese by Michael H. Tunick
  7. Beer: Tap into the Art and Science of Brewing, 3rd ed. by Charles Bamforth
  8. Let Thy Food Be Thy Medicine by Kathleen Hefferon
  9. The Oxford Book of Modern Science WritingEdited by Richard Dawkins
  10. Explaining Research: How to Reach Key Audiences to Advance Your Work by Dennis Meredith

Find more reading on our ACS Reading List on Riffle

More stuff that seems essential reading and I’m already so far behind.

— 1 month ago with 249 notes
unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 
I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!
This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.
(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock) 
Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here. 

This is lovely!

unconsumption:

Pay phone booth repurposed as a tiny library — a “take a book, leave a book” little free library. 

I LOVE THIS — a creative reuse and community win!

This micro-library sits in Houston, Texas, outside local coffee house Black Hole — with a laundromat next door — near the University of St. Thomas and Houston’s Museum District.

(photo by me, Houston-based Unconsumptioneer, mollyblock

Earlier Unconsumption posts on creative new uses for pay phones and phone booths can be found here, and library-related items here

This is lovely!

— 1 month ago with 893 notes
warbyparker:

Literary Rx: The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter
When Carson McCullers was 23 years old, she wrote a masterpiece called The Heart is a Lonely Hunter.
 + More 

Even after all these years this is hands down one of the weirdest books I’ve ever read. And my eighth-grade English teacher made us read some weird books. I think she had some problems.

warbyparker:

Literary Rx: The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter

When Carson McCullers was 23 years old, she wrote a masterpiece called The Heart is a Lonely Hunter.

Even after all these years this is hands down one of the weirdest books I’ve ever read. And my eighth-grade English teacher made us read some weird books. I think she had some problems.

— 1 month ago with 11 notes